The Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) has received complaints from Washington consumers of what appear to be loan collection scams. Numerous consumers reported they were contacted by entities claiming to collect debts owed to companies with “Cash Advance” in their names. The collection attempts often involve threats of lawsuits, asset seizure, and arrest. The consumers targeted did not actually owe the debt being collected. At least some of the consumers were targeted after they applied for loans from unlicensed online lenders.
1Maximum loan amount is $400 for first-time loan customers.Please note: This is an expensive form of borrowing. Cash Advance Now loans are designed to assist you in meeting your short-term borrowing needs and are not intended to be a long term financial solution. Examples of emergency reasons why these loans might be used include unexpected emergencies, car repair bills, medical care, or essential travel expenses.

A Lady named Karen, from Utica, NY, in the North, said we owed a PAYDAY Loan Co. and we don't and haven't for a long, long time.  Watch out for her.  She has all kind of threats.  Call US Cash Advance-916-458-5665 and they will tell you, you don't owe them a dime and they have been dealing with scammers for over a year.  Buy a whistle if they have your number, which they don't.  We had it changed.  Don't let her and anyone else from these d**n places scare you.
The Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) has received complaints from Washington consumers of what appear to be loan collection scams. Numerous consumers reported they were contacted by entities claiming to collect debts owed to companies with “Cash Advance” in their names. The collection attempts often involve threats of lawsuits, asset seizure, and arrest. The consumers targeted did not actually owe the debt being collected. At least some of the consumers were targeted after they applied for loans from unlicensed online lenders.

Had pulled out a few online loans that I was in the process of paying down and I received a phone call similar to those listed. A man with an Indian accent left me a message I could not understand but a few words, one of which being lawyer. Stated the same previously stated, that they had tried to pull money via an electronic check and that instead of trying to fight for the money, they closed the account and filed it as a loss. They were in turn deciding to file a lawsuit against me and an affidavit has been filed against me and I had to appear in court. The affidavit had been filed in my local state and I should have been contacted by the sheriff last week. I had not been and had gotten no other notices about this. In my pure panic I didn't ask all the questions I should have the first time around. I got on the phone and started calling courthouses here in Colorado Springs to try and find out when the court date was. Come to find there were no court dates. Was taking the court date seriously because I had missed a court date here for a traffic case and they arrested me and I spent the say in jail. Not a fun day. So, I decided to call the number back and the guy was very unprofessional which raised my suspicions. I started to ask the questions I should have asked the first time around. I asked what company it was, his reply being "Cash Advance USA". I looked back through my papers and that was not the company I had gone through. So then I asked, ok, do you have a case number and a court date? He said, yes, you are to appear in court today at 5:00 pm. I said, wow, ok, where at. He replied San Francisco court. I was like, ok, how does this make sense, you said that the case has been filed in my local state, and I've received no communications about this prior to today and you're telling me you don't have a case number and that I have to appear in San Francisco today. Really? He made some smug remarks and then it got quiet.... and he hung up on me. Thank God for this site and coming across these reports cause I was freaking out. They didn't tell me any information that was personal, account numbers, social or anything like that, but I am still all the same very concerned. The number they called on was 1-213-261-5794. They didn't tell me any amounts that I owed and he did also give me the same, do not interrupt me, you can ask questions after I am done. Anyway, hopefully others don't fall prey to these guys.
A cash advance loan works just like a payday loan. (Not surprising, since they’re the exact same thing.) To get one, you go to a payday lender and write a check. You date it for your next payday and make it out for the amount of the loan plus interest and fees. The lender will then give you cash or transfer money to your bank account. It’s yours to spend, but remember that check you wrote? As soon as your next payday arrives, the lender will cash it and the amount will be withdrawn from your bank account.
Residents of the State of Washington are informed that Washington State law provides in RCW 31.45.105(1)(d) and (3) that a “small loan” (sometimes referred to as a “payday loan”) made by an unlicensed entity to a person physically located in Washington State is uncollectible and unenforceable in Washington State. A “small loan” is defined in RCW 31.45.073 and is a loan that does not exceed $700. Collection activities involving loans of $700 or less are subject to RCW 31.45.082, which limits the time, place, and manner in which a payday loan may be collected. Payday lenders must also provide borrowers with an installment plan if the borrower is not able to pay the small loan back when it is due.
If you received a loan from a lender or owed money to a business and someone other than the lender or business is now attempting to collect from you, the collection activity may be subject to the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. If you receive a communication from a party claiming that a debt is owed, you can request a “written validation notice,” which must include the amount of the debt, the name of the creditor you owe, and your rights under the FDCPA. If you have questions regarding federal debt collection laws, you can contact the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP or online at www.ftc.gov.
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I contacted the FBI in my state closest to me and informed them.   I also contacted the Federal Trade Commision and filed a report with them.     If they keep calling you everyday, then you need to contact these agencies and also another thing I do is since I do not have a home phone anymore, I create a contact call "do not answer" and when I get one of these calls, I add the number to that contact. 
NM Residents: This lender is licensed and regulated by the New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department, Financial Institutions Division, P.O. Box 25101, 2550 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504. To report any unresolved problems or complaints, contact the division by telephone at (505) 476-4885 or visit the website http://www.rld.state.nm.us/financialinstitutions/.
Consumers should never make payments over the phone or via email to a third party debt collector that refuses to provide a written validation notice. Even if the party seems to have some of your personal or financial information, you should not make payments or provide bank account or credit card information without receiving a written validation notice. If the scammers already have your bank account information, social security number, or other nonpublic information, you may be a victim of identity theft. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has information for victims of identity theft available online at www.ftc.gov.
If you received a loan from a lender or owed money to a business and someone other than the lender or business is now attempting to collect from you, the collection activity may be subject to the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. If you receive a communication from a party claiming that a debt is owed, you can request a “written validation notice,” which must include the amount of the debt, the name of the creditor you owe, and your rights under the FDCPA. If you have questions regarding federal debt collection laws, you can contact the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP or online at www.ftc.gov.

It has become clear from numerous reports of this scam, that the scammers have come into posession of a large amount of personal information, including names, addresses, phone numbers, references, bank acct. numbers and social security numbers. Most of those reporting the scam indicate that at some time in the past, they filled out an online loan application. My guess is that these scammers have obtained (most likely illegally) a large database of this personal info.

Some reasons you might take a cash advance loan include the need to make emergency repairs to a car or home, cover unplanned medical expenses or pay for assistance with short-term needs that can't wait. Parents might seek cash advances to help cover back-to-school expenses when paychecks don't quite meet needs. Ultimately, though, once a cash advance is funded, the cash is yours to spend or save as you please. LendUp works to provide cash advance loan services that are simple to understand.

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