WARNING ABOUT FRAUD AND IDENTITY THEFT: Providing false information, including but not limited to the use of false or altered documents and the use of another person's identity other than your own (Identity Theft), is fraudulent and, in some cases, punishable by law. Allied Cash Advance Online reserves the right to report any and all information obtained in connection with a verified fraud attempt to local, state, or federal authorities including the Internet Crime Complaint Center, an FBI-NW3C partnership, for possible investigation and prosecution. For more information about the NW3C and the FBI, please visit www.ic3.gov.

Both men had Middle Eastern accents. The second guy kept saying "While on this federally recorded line are you willing to settle this situation"? I kept laughing at him saying that to attempt to scare me. I said I don't know what you're talking about and I know that this is a scam so I won't be paying anything, will be calling the Consumer Protection Bureau, and please take my number off of your call list at which time I was hung up on.
Spending less than you earn is key to staying afloat financially, yet many of us rely on credit cards to fund our lifestyles. With more than $16,000 in credit card debt per household in America, many of us struggle to understand what we can and cannot afford. Successful savers are very clear on that point and often live a frugal lifestyle despite having an income that can afford some luxuries. Warren Buffett, for example, still resides in the home he purchased for just $31,500 nearly 60 years ago, despite being one of the wealthiest people on the planet. Take it from Buffett: Maintaining a frugal lifestyle while your income continues to grow will help you reach your financial goals sooner.
One consumer reported receiving an email from a man calling himself William C. Jones, who claimed to work at a Federal Trade Commission office. He allegedly threatened to disclose the debt to the consumer’s employer, garnish wages, and file a lawsuit against the consumer. Another consumer reported receiving a similar e-mail from a person calling himself Neal Johnson. The consumer reported that what appear to be fake U.S. District Court arrest warrants were attached to these e-mails.
Another consumer reported receiving an email explaining a “Final Legal Notice” on behalf of a parent company of Cash Advance, Inc. The email was from a man calling himself Robert Jones and disclosed a fictitious case number and payment amount. He allegedly threatened legal proceedings and told the consumer that attorney fees would accompany the amount owed if he did not hear back from the consumer.
Snappy Payday Loans offers payday loan and cash advance options in Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. We currently do not offer loan options in Georgia, New Jersey, New York, and North Carolina.
This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 12/16/2009 11:49 AM and is a permanent record located here: https://www.ripoffreport.com/reports/cash-advance-usa-complete-scam/internet/cash-advance-usa-complete-scam-called-and-said-i-recieved-a-loan-i-never-recieved-the-540500. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year. Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report. READ: Foreign websites steal our content
Advanced Cash Services is not licensed by the Department. This entity is not registered to conduct business in Washington State by the Department of Licensing, the Department of Revenue, or the Secretary of State. Washington residents are advised that state law provides in RCW 31.45.105(1)(d) and (3) that a small loan made by an unlicensed entity to a person physically located in Washington is uncollectible and unenforceable in Washington State.
There are so many misconceptions about payday cash advances. There really is nothing to be afraid of. They are fast, simple, and they get the job done. The most important thing to realize is that you will have to pay back the loan sooner rather than later, and you will have to do it either in a lump sum, or in some cases in just a few installments. This means you must find a way to cover the loan and still cover regular expenses. Their very nature makes them a temporary solution, but a solution when no other may be available none the less. As long as you remember the ABCs of a cash advance, this can be a very power financial tool.
A cash advance loan works just like a payday loan. (Not surprising, since they’re the exact same thing.) To get one, you go to a payday lender and write a check. You date it for your next payday and make it out for the amount of the loan plus interest and fees. The lender will then give you cash or transfer money to your bank account. It’s yours to spend, but remember that check you wrote? As soon as your next payday arrives, the lender will cash it and the amount will be withdrawn from your bank account.
According to a 2016 study conducted by GOBankingRates, more than two-thirds of Americans have less than $1,000 saved, with 34 percent admitting to having absolutely no money in their savings account. Although today's consumers are more aware than ever about the importance of savvy spending, these statistics prompt the question: What does it take to be a successful saver? Luckily, this can be achieved in a handful of ways. Piggybacking on the ingenuity of Stephen Covey, author of "7 Habits of Highly Effective People," here are seven habits of highly successful savers.

For most people, a cash advance (also known as a payday advance) is something associated with a credit card or other line of credit. Many credit card companies make it easy for customers to receive cash advances nearby by using their credit card at a local ATM. The problem with such tactics is that the costs of the advance can add up quickly and you might not even realize what all those costs are. You'll likely pay an ATM fee charged by the bank that runs the machine, and you might also pay a fee to the credit card company for taking the advance, along with finance charges and interest if you don't pay the money back before your next billing cycle. Some credit card companies charge interest on cash advances that is higher than the interest charged on regular balances, which can make for surprising increases in your total balance.

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