Credit card cash advances can come in handy when there’s a necessary expense that you can’t charge to your card (like rent) and you don’t have the funds to cover it otherwise. But the problem with credit card cash advances is that they have fees and interest rates that are generally much higher than if you just used your credit card to make a purchase. Also, you can only borrow as much as your cash advance limit allows, and if you already have a balance on your credit card, that amount may be reduced.
For instance, if a looming credit card or other loan payment is jeopardizing your ability to pay for basic expenses, see if you can work out a deal. “If you’re having trouble making your monthly payments, call your lender to ask for more time,” suggests Natasha Rachel Smith, consumer affairs expert at rebate website TopCashback. “You’d be surprised how willing they are to work with you on your payment schedule. … It pays to be transparent.”

In Texas, Speedy Cash operates as a Registered Credit Access Business (CAB). The actual Lender is an unaffiliated third party. Speedy Cash engages in the money transmission business as an authorized delegate of Western Union Financial Services, Inc. under Chapter 151 of the Texas Finance Code. Speedy Cash engages in the money transmission and/or currency exchange business as an authorized delegate of MoneyGram Payment Systems, Inc. and Western Union Financial Services under Chapter 151 of the Texas Finance Code.


For most people, a cash advance (also known as a payday advance) is something associated with a credit card or other line of credit. Many credit card companies make it easy for customers to receive cash advances nearby by using their credit card at a local ATM. The problem with such tactics is that the costs of the advance can add up quickly and you might not even realize what all those costs are. You'll likely pay an ATM fee charged by the bank that runs the machine, and you might also pay a fee to the credit card company for taking the advance, along with finance charges and interest if you don't pay the money back before your next billing cycle. Some credit card companies charge interest on cash advances that is higher than the interest charged on regular balances, which can make for surprising increases in your total balance.
I was desperate money. I had applied for a short term loan. They called and asked me what I wanted. I said 2000.00 and they said they would give me 10000.00 something. I was like ok. I went to my bank and there was no deposit from anyone except for my wife's check. They emailed me saying that they're going to make it so I can't get a job. My account will be frozen etc. I contacted the FBI and sent them the email I received from them. So if they are reading this and I hope they are but the FBI is coming. Run and hide.
A: Cash advance loans are a safe and convenient way to allow you to cover unplanned expenses or cover everyday bills when you're tight on cash. Typically, these are short term loans - such as payday loans - that provide quick cash. Whether your budget comes up short, or you need help with unexpected bills, a cash advance might provide the cash you need.

For instance, if a looming credit card or other loan payment is jeopardizing your ability to pay for basic expenses, see if you can work out a deal. “If you’re having trouble making your monthly payments, call your lender to ask for more time,” suggests Natasha Rachel Smith, consumer affairs expert at rebate website TopCashback. “You’d be surprised how willing they are to work with you on your payment schedule. … It pays to be transparent.”


California Residents: Flurish Inc. dba LendUp is licensed by the Department of Business Oversight, pursuant to the California Deferred Deposit Transaction Law, license #1004393, and the California Financing Law, license #6054610. LendUp loans made under the authority of its CFL license are made pursuant to the California Financing Law. LendUp credit cards are not offered under any license regulated by the California Department of Business Oversight.


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Unlike cash advance loans and credit card cash advances, an employer cash advance is not a loan. The money you receive is yours—it comes straight out of your next paycheck. Not all employers offer cash advances, and those that do may have strict policies that limit the number of times you can request an advance and reserve approval for true emergencies.
Consumers should never make payments over the phone or via email to a third party debt collector that refuses to provide a written validation notice. Even if the party seems to have some of your personal or financial information, you should not make payments or provide bank account or credit card information without receiving a written validation notice. If the scammers already have your bank account information, social security number, or other nonpublic information, you may be a victim of identity theft. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has information for victims of identity theft available online at www.ftc.gov.
If you feel you have been the victim of a loan scam please contact the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP (382-4357) or online at www.ftc.gov; or contact the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (855) 411-CFPB (2372) or online at www.consumerfinance.gov. Because the scammers have access to bank account information and social security numbers, victims should consider themselves victims of identity theft and take appropriate precautions. The Federal Trade Commission has information for victims of identity theft available online at www.ftc.gov.
I just had a wonderful time jerking these people off. They've been robocalling me a couple of times a day for some weeks, so I finally decided to call back and really piss them off. No legitimate company calls you to offer you a loan - you have to call them and actually apply. Anyway, these jerkoffs kept hanging up on me so I kept calling back - 15 times before they finally blocked my number. I then used another phone to call again and pretend like I really wanted a loan.
Residents of the State of Washington are informed that Washington State law provides in RCW 31.45.105(1)(d) and (3) that a “small loan” (sometimes referred to as a “payday loan”) made by an unlicensed entity to a person physically located in Washington State is uncollectible and unenforceable in Washington State. A “small loan” is defined in RCW 31.45.073 and is a loan that does not exceed $700. Collection activities involving loans of $700 or less are subject to RCW 31.45.082, which limits the time, place, and manner in which a payday loan may be collected. Payday lenders must also provide borrowers with an installment plan if the borrower is not able to pay the small loan back when it is due.
Very grateful that I found this website. I just received a call like the majority of the ones I see you all mentioned. I have actually taken out pay day loans and presently have some out right now, but I pay them all back on time. This was the first time I ever received a call of this nature, but I guess when  you endlessly put your info out here the scammers will get it because a lot of them are FAKE lenders and are just pretending to be that in an effort to get your info and later scam you. At any rate....
1. I am a regular or reserve member of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or Coast Guard, serving on active duty under a call or order that does not specify a period of 30 days or fewer or dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty. A dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty as described above is the member's spouse, the member's child under the age of eighteen years old, or an individual for whom the member provided more than one-half of his/her financial support for 180 days immediately preceding today's date.

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