<>Keep in mind that this option might be the most financially advantageous, but it can also be the most tricky to navigate. Borrowing money from a friend turns a personal relationship into a business one — you need to be comfortable with the fact that you are indebted to that person and the relationship could turn sour if you fail to uphold your end of the bargain.
<>A woman named Amy ** emailed and sent me a text that I was approved for $4000. Now I didn't need that much, but I called. Amy had a thick accent like from India. After straining to understand her she said it would be $250 per month. Not too bad I told her. But the catch... She wanted me to send them money first then they would deposit my money. What? She called it "insurance". I told her no and not to ever contact me again. Be aware of this company.
<>One consumer reported receiving an email from a man calling himself William C. Jones, who claimed to work at a Federal Trade Commission office. He allegedly threatened to disclose the debt to the consumer’s employer, garnish wages, and file a lawsuit against the consumer. Another consumer reported receiving a similar e-mail from a person calling himself Neal Johnson. The consumer reported that what appear to be fake U.S. District Court arrest warrants were attached to these e-mails.
<>Another consumer reported receiving an email explaining a “Final Legal Notice” on behalf of a parent company of Cash Advance, Inc. The email was from a man calling himself Robert Jones and disclosed a fictitious case number and payment amount. He allegedly threatened legal proceedings and told the consumer that attorney fees would accompany the amount owed if he did not hear back from the consumer.
<>We want to hear from you and encourage a lively discussion among our users. Please help us keep our site clean and safe by following our posting guidelines, and avoid disclosing personal or sensitive information such as bank account or phone numbers. Any comments posted under NerdWallet's official account are not reviewed or endorsed by representatives of financial institutions affiliated with the reviewed products, unless explicitly stated otherwise.
<>There are so many misconceptions about payday cash advances. There really is nothing to be afraid of. They are fast, simple, and they get the job done. The most important thing to realize is that you will have to pay back the loan sooner rather than later, and you will have to do it either in a lump sum, or in some cases in just a few installments. This means you must find a way to cover the loan and still cover regular expenses. Their very nature makes them a temporary solution, but a solution when no other may be available none the less. As long as you remember the ABCs of a cash advance, this can be a very power financial tool.
<>Residents of the State of Washington are informed that Washington State law provides in RCW 31.45.105(1)(d) and (3) that a “small loan” (sometimes referred to as a “payday loan”) made by an unlicensed entity to a person physically located in Washington State is uncollectible and unenforceable in Washington State. A “small loan” is defined in RCW 31.45.073 and is a loan that does not exceed $700. Collection activities involving loans of $700 or less are subject to RCW 31.45.082, which limits the time, place, and manner in which a payday loan may be collected. Payday lenders must also provide borrowers with an installment plan if the borrower is not able to pay the small loan back when it is due.
<>Cash Advance® does not make credit decisions nor does Cash Advance® conduct a credit inquiry on consumers. Some lenders on the Cash Advance® network may conduct a non-traditional credit check in order to determine your eligibility for a loan. Lenders typically do not conduct a credit inquiry with the three major credit bureaus: Transunion, Experian, or Equifax. If you do not repay your loan on time your lender may report this delinquency to one or more credit bureaus, which could have a negative impact on your credit score. We encourage consumers with credit problems to consult a Credit Counseling company.
<>Payday loans grant you access to emergency funds that can help you deal with debts that pile up due to unexpected incidents. For example, a medical emergency could render you too sick to work, but the cost of a doctor could be too much for your current funds. No money, no doctor. No doctor, no work. No work, no money. Unfortunate cycles like this can lock you into a no-win situation.
<>Another consumer reported receiving an email explaining a “Final Legal Notice” on behalf of a parent company of Cash Advance, Inc. The email was from a man calling himself Robert Jones and disclosed a fictitious case number and payment amount. He allegedly threatened legal proceedings and told the consumer that attorney fees would accompany the amount owed if he did not hear back from the consumer.
<>I have been applying for a short term loan and received a call from a Justin ** from Cash Advance America, saying I had been approved for a loan for $8,000 and to call them on **. I just read about the scams going around and I have already been scammed by one of the loan companies that said they were one thing but the real company said there were a lot of fraudulent companies using their name.
<>Several consumers also reported receiving phone calls from entities attempting to collect debts owed to Cash Advance, Cash Advance Group, and US Cash Advance. Some of the collection calls came from people who called themselves Brian Wilson, John Murphy, Jim Spencer, and Andrew Martin. Some calls also came from a person claiming to work for Peterson Law Group and Debt Collection USA.
<>Got a call today, 312-248-2234, and answered to hear that I was preapproved for a thousand dollars loan, and just call them back at same phone number. I called back, they answered Cash Advance. I asked "Do you have a web site?" I like to see how professional or cheesy a site is, as a place to start, in looking at a company. If their site is not professional, then neither are they! I even look for typos. Well, the guy just hung up on me. So I started researching (yes, I can use a grand or two this month), and found all of these reviews.
<>So I received a few text messages from someone by the name of David ** and purchased an 86 dollar iTunes card then gave the card info to Mr. ** and they proceeded to tell me it would cost me 125 dollars for the insurance of my loan amount. Was told upon payment my account would be credited 5400 dollars? I realize I have been scammed and am out almost 90 dollars. I just hope someone else doesn’t fall for this. The number that called me was **.
<>In another case, the consumer reported that the caller threatened to seize the consumer’s bank account and serve the consumer with legal papers at his workplace unless he paid the debt. Another consumer reported being threatened with arrest. In one case, a consumer reported the debt collector threatened that he could have an arrest warrant issued if the consumer did not immediately pay him with a credit card. In other cases, consumers report the debt collector demanded payment using a pre-paid card.
<>Once you determine that cash advances are allowed, you’ll need to request one. Some companies have a formal process in place, while others may allow you to speak privately with your supervisor. Experts suggest that employees approach this conversation tactfully. Time it so you don’t ask when things are hectic at work and prepare a good argument for why you need the advance and why it’s urgent.6
<>For instance, if a looming credit card or other loan payment is jeopardizing your ability to pay for basic expenses, see if you can work out a deal. “If you’re having trouble making your monthly payments, call your lender to ask for more time,” suggests Natasha Rachel Smith, consumer affairs expert at rebate website TopCashback. “You’d be surprised how willing they are to work with you on your payment schedule. … It pays to be transparent.”
<>I just received the same exact call on my job. He said there are some charges being filed against me. I asked for what. He said he is going to read the affidavit and told me not to interrupt him. He had an accent too. He said that I took out a payday loan with Cash Advance USA last year using my US Bank account and that I wrote them bad checks and have closed my account. First of all my US Bank account is just 1 month old...I asked for his name and told him I was going to report him. He said he is going to have the state of California police and my police to come to my job and pick me up in 24 hours then he hung up in my face.  And I know for a fact I haven't taken out a payday loan. That is just crazy that people are trying to scam others.
<>A Lady named Karen Williams will keep e-mailing and e-mailing saying my Husband will be served with papers to go to Court and that his social is on hold.  She saids we got a Payday Loan from:  US Cash Advance with the number:877-817-8791.  Her number which stays busy all the time is:  916-458-5665.  She is from Utica, NY, Yankee LAND.  She has an old address and an old number.  Watch for her.  She is trouble, bug trouble.  Now, I have to get me another Yahoo e-mail address.
<>LendUp doesn't limit how your cash advance is used. Once you are approved for a cash advance loan amount and you receive those funds, the money is yours. LendUp does encourage responsible use of financial resources, which is why we offer financial education and the LendUp Ladder in eligible states. We want you to succeed financially, so our goal is to help eligible individuals build credit over time. Because of that commitment, we hope that individuals who take cash advances from LendUp use them responsibly.
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