Another consumer reported receiving an email explaining a “Final Legal Notice” on behalf of a parent company of Cash Advance, Inc. The email was from a man calling himself Robert Jones and disclosed a fictitious case number and payment amount. He allegedly threatened legal proceedings and told the consumer that attorney fees would accompany the amount owed if he did not hear back from the consumer.
To inquire about an advance on your paycheck, either talk to your boss directly or go to your human resources department. While ideally, your employer wouldn’t be too involved in your private life, it’s best to be prepared with an explanation as to what the money's for and why you need it so urgently. Otherwise, your boss is left to wonder if there’s an underlying personal issue that could someday impact your work performance, such as a gambling addiction.
By clicking 'Apply Now', I affirm that I have read, understand, and agree to the Disclaimer, Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. My click is my electronic signature, and I authorize you to share my information with lenders and partners that might use SMS messaging, auto-dialers or prerecorded telemarketing messages to call or text me on my mobile phone or landline. I understand that consent is not required to obtain a loan. I further understand that I have no obligation to accept a loan once I am connected with an available lender and that not all applicants will be approved for a loan. I further understand that the operator of this website is not a lender, loan broker, or agent for any lender or loan broker and does not make credit or loan decisions.
USACashAdvance.com is not a lender and does not provide short-term loans but refers consumers to lenders who may provide such loans. For this reason, we are unable to supply you with an exact APR (Annual Percentage Rate) that you will be charged if you are approved for a loan. APRs vary according to the information supplied by you in your loan request and your lender. You will be given the APR, loan fees, and other terms by your lender when you are redirected to your loan agreement in the loan request process. The APR on a cash loan can range from 200% to 2,290% depending on how the APR is calculated (nominal vs. effective), the duration of the loan, loan fees incurred, late payment fees, non-payment fees, loan renewal actions, and other factors. Keep in mind that the APR range is not your finance charge and your finance charge will be disclosed later on, if applicable.
They contacted me today. Said his name was Michael Ray @ 717-612+4596(which is not a working #) the number they called from 717-724-0000 has been disconnected. He stated I was being sued for no payment on the loan that was deposited in my acct in Sept for $400. While on the phone I got online to check my acct. no funds ever. I had checked into some, but never followed thru. When I told him that he said in his accent that he would have to call me back. I said I would stay on the line. He said he was going to lunch and that he would call me later. I then said I wanted to speak to his manager. He stated he did not have one, I said so you answer to know one?? he got rude and said he would call me back. I asked for the phone number and proof in writing for this supposed loan. He said since it was done online, it was not needed. I then asked for Cash Advances phone # he said I would have to go on their website and get it.
According to a 2016 study conducted by GOBankingRates, more than two-thirds of Americans have less than $1,000 saved, with 34 percent admitting to having absolutely no money in their savings account. Although today's consumers are more aware than ever about the importance of savvy spending, these statistics prompt the question: What does it take to be a successful saver? Luckily, this can be achieved in a handful of ways. Piggybacking on the ingenuity of Stephen Covey, author of "7 Habits of Highly Effective People," here are seven habits of highly successful savers.
So I received a few text messages from someone by the name of David ** and purchased an 86 dollar iTunes card then gave the card info to Mr. ** and they proceeded to tell me it would cost me 125 dollars for the insurance of my loan amount. Was told upon payment my account would be credited 5400 dollars? I realize I have been scammed and am out almost 90 dollars. I just hope someone else doesn’t fall for this. The number that called me was **.

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NOTICE: The Federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act prohibits creditors from discriminating against credit applicants on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, marital status, age (provided the applicant has the capacity to enter into a binding contract); because all or part of the applicant's income derives from any public assistance program; or because the applicant has in good faith exercised any right under the Consumer Credit Protection Act. The Federal agency that administers compliance with this law concerning this creditor is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 1700 G Street NW, Washington DC 20006 and the Federal Trade Commission, Equal Credit Opportunity, Washington DC 20580.


For most people, a cash advance (also known as a payday advance) is something associated with a credit card or other line of credit. Many credit card companies make it easy for customers to receive cash advances nearby by using their credit card at a local ATM. The problem with such tactics is that the costs of the advance can add up quickly and you might not even realize what all those costs are. You'll likely pay an ATM fee charged by the bank that runs the machine, and you might also pay a fee to the credit card company for taking the advance, along with finance charges and interest if you don't pay the money back before your next billing cycle. Some credit card companies charge interest on cash advances that is higher than the interest charged on regular balances, which can make for surprising increases in your total balance.

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