They contacted me today. Said his name was Michael Ray @ 717-612+4596(which is not a working #) the number they called from 717-724-0000 has been disconnected. He stated I was being sued for no payment on the loan that was deposited in my acct in Sept for $400. While on the phone I got online to check my acct. no funds ever. I had checked into some, but never followed thru. When I told him that he said in his accent that he would have to call me back. I said I would stay on the line. He said he was going to lunch and that he would call me later. I then said I wanted to speak to his manager. He stated he did not have one, I said so you answer to know one?? he got rude and said he would call me back. I asked for the phone number and proof in writing for this supposed loan. He said since it was done online, it was not needed. I then asked for Cash Advances phone # he said I would have to go on their website and get it.
One consumer reported receiving an email from a man calling himself William C. Jones, who claimed to work at a Federal Trade Commission office. He allegedly threatened to disclose the debt to the consumer’s employer, garnish wages, and file a lawsuit against the consumer. Another consumer reported receiving a similar e-mail from a person calling himself Neal Johnson. The consumer reported that what appear to be fake U.S. District Court arrest warrants were attached to these e-mails.
Emergencies are inherently unexpected and almost always emotionally and financially jarring. Emergency funds are a key component in the arsenal of a successful saver because they not only mitigate the financial burden of unexpected expenses, they also help reduce the stress which often accompanies them. Unlike the amount you set aside for a specific purchase, an emergency fund is to be used exclusively for events like family crises, medical issues and natural disasters. People with emergency savings avoid crippling debt and are on the road to recovery much more quickly than those who are unprepared.
The Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) has received complaints from Washington consumers of what appear to be loan collection scams. Numerous consumers reported they were contacted by entities claiming to collect debts owed to companies with “Cash Advance” in their names. The collection attempts often involve threats of lawsuits, asset seizure, and arrest. The consumers targeted did not actually owe the debt being collected. At least some of the consumers were targeted after they applied for loans from unlicensed online lenders.
1. I am a regular or reserve member of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or Coast Guard, serving on active duty under a call or order that does not specify a period of 30 days or fewer or dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty. A dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty as described above is the member's spouse, the member's child under the age of eighteen years old, or an individual for whom the member provided more than one-half of his/her financial support for 180 days immediately preceding today's date.

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