By accepting these terms, you authorize us to contact you at all the telephone numbers associated with your account that you provide in order to provide information about your loan, for marketing, and to inform you of promotions, savings and/or other services that may be of interest to you by using prerecorded/artificial voice messages, text messages, and/or automated dialing devices. Calls and messages from us may result in charges to you from your cellular or wireless provider. You can opt out at any time by calling 1-888-801-9075, emailing support@cashnetusa.com or logging in to your account at www.cashnetusa.com and updating your contact preferences. You do not have to opt in to this service or agree to opt in as a condition of receiving services from us.
Unlike cash advance loans and credit card cash advances, an employer cash advance is not a loan. The money you receive is yours—it comes straight out of your next paycheck. Not all employers offer cash advances, and those that do may have strict policies that limit the number of times you can request an advance and reserve approval for true emergencies.

Cash Advance® does not make credit decisions nor does Cash Advance® conduct a credit inquiry on consumers. Some lenders on the Cash Advance® network may conduct a non-traditional credit check in order to determine your eligibility for a loan. Lenders typically do not conduct a credit inquiry with the three major credit bureaus: Transunion, Experian, or Equifax. If you do not repay your loan on time your lender may report this delinquency to one or more credit bureaus, which could have a negative impact on your credit score. We encourage consumers with credit problems to consult a Credit Counseling company.


Some reasons you might take a cash advance loan include the need to make emergency repairs to a car or home, cover unplanned medical expenses or pay for assistance with short-term needs that can't wait. Parents might seek cash advances to help cover back-to-school expenses when paychecks don't quite meet needs. Ultimately, though, once a cash advance is funded, the cash is yours to spend or save as you please. LendUp works to provide cash advance loan services that are simple to understand.

I kept getting text messages, no legit phone calls, just texts. Now today they're threatening to take me to court, tell my employer etc for a $300 loan. Told them they can tell whoever, garnish my wages (I'm retired) etc., This was in an email they sent today 9/13/17. Now my loan is close to $1K due to interest etc. I just laughed. I don't take LOANS out for $300. I either write a check or use credit card. They want me to settle today for the $300. I'll never settle. Told them I'll have my lawyers ready also. I dont know who Cash Advance USA is anyway, let alone loan from them. Then I googled all this - it's a SCAM!! Must be bunch of out of work "lawyers" that are trying to scam people & scare them. I told them to bring it on, I'm ready! Ridiculous - get a real job!


Washington State residents only: If you are a victim of a collection scam or if you suspect illegal or fraudulent activity involving a financial product or service, please contact the Department of Financial Institutions at 1-877-RING-DFI (746-4334), or online at www.dfi.wa.gov. You may also wish to contact the state of Washington Office of the Attorney General at www.atg.wa.gov.


One consumer reported receiving an email from a man calling himself William C. Jones, who claimed to work at a Federal Trade Commission office. He allegedly threatened to disclose the debt to the consumer’s employer, garnish wages, and file a lawsuit against the consumer. Another consumer reported receiving a similar e-mail from a person calling himself Neal Johnson. The consumer reported that what appear to be fake U.S. District Court arrest warrants were attached to these e-mails.
I am working on my college assignment, when I take a break and check my cell phone. I received not one but three calls from PCS ( a collection agency) and they left one message urging me to contact a Thomas Williams about an overdue payday advance. I returned his call many times to try to explain that I never received a payday advance loan of any sort. He first claimed it was done in May of 2010 and again in August of 2011. He had my social security number, my name and cell number, and my girlfriend's name.
“While admittedly another high APR loan option, if in a financial pinch, the fees and terms might be better than those offered by a payday loan,” explains McDermott. The key is to pay off the advance right away, before you begin racking up interest on the balance. If you allow the balance to linger month over month, your short-term loan could spiral into a long-term debt problem.
1. I am a regular or reserve member of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or Coast Guard, serving on active duty under a call or order that does not specify a period of 30 days or fewer or dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty. A dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty as described above is the member's spouse, the member's child under the age of eighteen years old, or an individual for whom the member provided more than one-half of his/her financial support for 180 days immediately preceding today's date.

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Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not financial advice. Always consult p professional before making any financial decisions.

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