Another consumer reported receiving an email explaining a “Final Legal Notice” on behalf of a parent company of Cash Advance, Inc. The email was from a man calling himself Robert Jones and disclosed a fictitious case number and payment amount. He allegedly threatened legal proceedings and told the consumer that attorney fees would accompany the amount owed if he did not hear back from the consumer.
If you carry only credit cards for day-to-day spending, you could find yourself in a pinch when confronted with a cash-only situation, such as buying lunch from a street vendor, veggies at a farmers market or a sandwich at a mom-and-pop deli. In that case, a cash advance might be tempting. Some people also turn to credit card cash advances when they need paper money but don’t have enough in their bank account.

A Lady named Karen, from Utica, NY, in the North, said we owed a PAYDAY Loan Co. and we don't and haven't for a long, long time.  Watch out for her.  She has all kind of threats.  Call US Cash Advance-916-458-5665 and they will tell you, you don't owe them a dime and they have been dealing with scammers for over a year.  Buy a whistle if they have your number, which they don't.  We had it changed.  Don't let her and anyone else from these d**n places scare you.
I was told I was approved for a $6000 loan. I had to go buy $147 in iTunes gift cards. I had to give them the number of the back of the cards. Which they redeemed after I gave the cards. Then they wanted me to send them $387 to finish my part saying that this will prove that I could pay the loan back, this was my verification process. Cash Advance USA, Dallas Texas ripped me off for $150. Something needs to be done to these con artists.
People who set goals for a purchase – whether it's a car, television or family vacation – are more apt to reduce unnecessary spending in pursuit of that goal. While other consumers use credit cards to purchase items they can't afford, effective savers rarely spend money they don't have. The next time you decide to invest in a big purchase, review your budget to see where you can make cuts to allocate more funds toward that goal. You can also boost your income to reach your savings goals quicker by taking on side jobs, such as freelance writing, dog walking or another gig that takes advantage of your marketable skills.

I checked with greendot and verified the information. I called back and talked with thomas'  supervisor Adam and explained what happened. Adam would not give me the number to Cash Advance Usa, he told me to go online to www.cashadvanceusa.com. I came up with a blank page. I did a google search and found under the search.........this scam. I called Adam back and told him that I knew it was a scam he was involved in and that if I received further calls about this matter I would be forced to contact the authorities.
Line of Credit: Available at Allied Cash Advance locations in Virginia only. Approval depends upon meeting legal, regulatory and underwriting requirements. Allied Cash Advance may, at their discretion, verify application information by using national databases that may provide information from one or more national credit bureaus, and Allied Cash Advance or third party lenders may take that into consideration in the approval process. Credit limits range from $250 to $1500. After your line of credit is set up, you have the option to draw any amount greater than $100, in increments of $5 up to the credit limit, as long as: you make your scheduled payments; and your outstanding balance does not exceed your approved credit limit. Minimum payments are calculated based on the outstanding balance owed, plus applicable fees and interest. As long as you continue to make on-time and complete payments, you will remain in good standing and be able to continue using your line of credit account.
To get a credit card cash advance you go to an ATM or bank location and use your credit card to withdraw money. The amount you withdraw is added to your credit card bill almost as if you were using your card to make a purchase. But unlike using a debit card, the money that you get through a credit card cash advance doesn’t come from your bank account. It’s loaned to you by your credit card company, and you’re responsible for paying it back.
When you receive a raise, it's tempting to spend more money on things and experiences that make you happy. However, the "hedonic treadmill" theory suggests that even though an income boost can make us feel like we've earned an uptick in spending, our newfound windfall will eventually leave us as unsatisfied as we were prior to the raise because our needs don't disappear – they just get grander. Savvy savers know to avoid lifestyle inflation during periods of income growth and invest in themselves instead. This can mean upping retirement contributions or diverting the difference into a savings account, emergency fund or toward some other financial goal.
For most people, a cash advance (also known as a payday advance) is something associated with a credit card or other line of credit. Many credit card companies make it easy for customers to receive cash advances nearby by using their credit card at a local ATM. The problem with such tactics is that the costs of the advance can add up quickly and you might not even realize what all those costs are. You'll likely pay an ATM fee charged by the bank that runs the machine, and you might also pay a fee to the credit card company for taking the advance, along with finance charges and interest if you don't pay the money back before your next billing cycle. Some credit card companies charge interest on cash advances that is higher than the interest charged on regular balances, which can make for surprising increases in your total balance.

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