I received an email to call for a personal loan from Cash Advance USA. I was approved for $2000. They wanted my passwords and account numbers. They were going to deposit money in my account and wanted me to send it back to verify my account then they would deposit the $2000. If I would have done that I would have been out $200. They tried to scam me.

Editorial Note: This content is not provided or commissioned by the credit card issuer. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of the credit card issuer, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the credit card issuer. Every reasonable effort has been made to maintain accurate information, however all credit card information is presented without warranty. After you click on an offer you will be directed to the credit card issuer’s web site where you can review the terms and conditions for your offer.
Notice to Texas and Ohio Customers: In Texas and Ohio, RISE is a Credit Services Organization/Credit Access Business operating in accordance with each state’s applicable Credit Services Organization Act. In Ohio, RISE Credit Service of Ohio, LLC d/b/a RISE is licensed by the Department of Commerce, Division of Financial Institutions Certificate No. CS.900086.000. In Texas, RISE Credit Service of Texas, LLC d/b/a RISE is licensed by the Office of the Consumer Credit Commissioner, License No. 16507-62536. RISE is not the lender or a fiduciary of the lender.
Spending less than you earn is key to staying afloat financially, yet many of us rely on credit cards to fund our lifestyles. With more than $16,000 in credit card debt per household in America, many of us struggle to understand what we can and cannot afford. Successful savers are very clear on that point and often live a frugal lifestyle despite having an income that can afford some luxuries. Warren Buffett, for example, still resides in the home he purchased for just $31,500 nearly 60 years ago, despite being one of the wealthiest people on the planet. Take it from Buffett: Maintaining a frugal lifestyle while your income continues to grow will help you reach your financial goals sooner.
To get a credit card cash advance you go to an ATM or bank location and use your credit card to withdraw money. The amount you withdraw is added to your credit card bill almost as if you were using your card to make a purchase. But unlike using a debit card, the money that you get through a credit card cash advance doesn’t come from your bank account. It’s loaned to you by your credit card company, and you’re responsible for paying it back.
In AK, AZ, DC, FL, HI, IN, KY, MI, MN, MT, ND, NE, OK, OR, SD, WA and WY all installment loans are originated by FinWise Bank, a Utah chartered bank, located in Sandy, Utah, member FDIC. California applicants may be funded by one of several lenders, including: (i) FinWise Bank; or, (ii) OppLoans, a licensed lender in certain states. All loans funded by FinWise Bank will be serviced by OppLoans.
One consumer reported receiving an email from a man calling himself William C. Jones, who claimed to work at a Federal Trade Commission office. He allegedly threatened to disclose the debt to the consumer’s employer, garnish wages, and file a lawsuit against the consumer. Another consumer reported receiving a similar e-mail from a person calling himself Neal Johnson. The consumer reported that what appear to be fake U.S. District Court arrest warrants were attached to these e-mails.
Consumers should never make payments over the phone or via email to a third party debt collector that refuses to provide a written validation notice. Even if the party seems to have some of your personal or financial information, you should not make payments or provide bank account or credit card information without receiving a written validation notice. If the scammers already have your bank account information, social security number, or other nonpublic information, you may be a victim of identity theft. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has information for victims of identity theft available online at www.ftc.gov.
Although the amount of money will vary depending on several factors, most people will qualify to borrow up to $500 with a two weeks term. Before taking a cash advance loan, we encourage you to assess your financial situation to make sure it is necessary and that you’ll be comfortable to pay back. We are here to help and wouldn’t want anyone trapped in debt.
I first got an UKNOWN call which I usually don't answer. The guy, with a Middle Eastern accent, said he was Deputy Mike Anderson and called from 313-420-6843. He said they had received a complaint against me and if I didn't call this other number to find out what it was about that they would be issuing a warrant. So I'm already laughing like "What BS is this about?" Because I don't bother anyone and am most certainly not a criminal. So I call the number which is a Maryland number 410-390-9007. The guy whose name I was given was Mark Taylor and he put me on hold to pull up my file.
The application and approval process is fast and simple. The application usually takes just a few minutes, and the only requirements are usually that the applicant be of legal age and have a job. If funds are to be direct deposited, there must a bank account for it to go to, and having an account from which the lender can draft payment could make for better terms. Once application is made, approval can take anywhere from a few minutes to 48 hours, but rarely more than 48 hours. After approval, money can be in had in just a few hours. Sometimes it takes up to 48 hours, depending on the lender’s specific processes, but again rarely longer.
Another consumer reported receiving an email explaining a “Final Legal Notice” on behalf of a parent company of Cash Advance, Inc. The email was from a man calling himself Robert Jones and disclosed a fictitious case number and payment amount. He allegedly threatened legal proceedings and told the consumer that attorney fees would accompany the amount owed if he did not hear back from the consumer.
This report was posted on Ripoff Report on 12/16/2009 11:49 AM and is a permanent record located here: https://www.ripoffreport.com/reports/cash-advance-usa-complete-scam/internet/cash-advance-usa-complete-scam-called-and-said-i-recieved-a-loan-i-never-recieved-the-540500. The posting time indicated is Arizona local time. Arizona does not observe daylight savings so the post time may be Mountain or Pacific depending on the time of year. Ripoff Report has an exclusive license to this report. It may not be copied without the written permission of Ripoff Report. READ: Foreign websites steal our content

I was told I was approved for a $6000 loan. I had to go buy $147 in iTunes gift cards. I had to give them the number of the back of the cards. Which they redeemed after I gave the cards. Then they wanted me to send them $387 to finish my part saying that this will prove that I could pay the loan back, this was my verification process. Cash Advance USA, Dallas Texas ripped me off for $150. Something needs to be done to these con artists.

We'll also ask for your employment details or the source of any recurring income. Once you complete an application with LendUp for a short-term loan, we provide an answer instantly. We don't rely on a traditional credit check or credit score to make lending decisions, opening the door for individuals who might have struggled with credit in the past. You won't have to fax any documents or wait days for an answer. LendUp's short-term loan options usually offer approved first-time borrowers up to $250; by paying on time and working with LendUp again in the future, you might be able to increase how much you can borrow at a time (availability varies by state).

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