Many people have trouble paying back their cash advance loans, and rollover is common. In fact, 80 percent of cash advances are rolled over or followed by another loan within 14 days of the first.3 And far too often it doesn’t end there. The loan becomes due and borrowers still can’t pay back the lump sum they owe, so what do they do? They roll it over once more and the cycle starts again.
If you received a loan from a lender or owed money to a business and someone other than the lender or business is now attempting to collect from you, the collection activity may be subject to the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. If you receive a communication from a party claiming that a debt is owed, you can request a “written validation notice,” which must include the amount of the debt, the name of the creditor you owe, and your rights under the FDCPA. If you have questions regarding federal debt collection laws, you can contact the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP or online at www.ftc.gov.
A: Cash advance loans are a safe and convenient way to allow you to cover unplanned expenses or cover everyday bills when you're tight on cash. Typically, these are short term loans - such as payday loans - that provide quick cash. Whether your budget comes up short, or you need help with unexpected bills, a cash advance might provide the cash you need.
Consumer Notice: Cash advances are short-term loans, and can typically range from $100 to $999. They are intended for short-term financial relief and do not constitute long-term financial solutions. For example, they can generally be intended to be repaid within a year. Consumers facing debt and credit difficulties should seek out debt and credit advisory help. Federal and state laws cover certain types of lenders and loans, including short-term loans. If a lender is wholly owned and operated by a federally recognized American Indian Tribe and sovereign government, applicable Tribal and Federal law governs its loans and related contracts, requests and documents. Consumers are encouraged to research laws that may be applicable to short-term loans, and to ask their lenders for more information.
One consumer reported receiving an email from a man calling himself William C. Jones, who claimed to work at a Federal Trade Commission office. He allegedly threatened to disclose the debt to the consumer’s employer, garnish wages, and file a lawsuit against the consumer. Another consumer reported receiving a similar e-mail from a person calling himself Neal Johnson. The consumer reported that what appear to be fake U.S. District Court arrest warrants were attached to these e-mails.
All of a sudden I started getting threatening emails from someone stating that if I do not pay an unverified debt that charges would be filed on my name and social security number. I replied back to the individual who emailed me and a demanded that they no longer contact me and that I was submitting a complaint to the CFPB and my Attorney General. They then replied back to me with the name, partial social security number, mailing address, phone number and amount owed of the person they believed to be me. I then sent the email to my Attorney General with my complaint.
I just received the same exact call on my job. He said there are some charges being filed against me. I asked for what. He said he is going to read the affidavit and told me not to interrupt him. He had an accent too. He said that I took out a payday loan with Cash Advance USA last year using my US Bank account and that I wrote them bad checks and have closed my account. First of all my US Bank account is just 1 month old...I asked for his name and told him I was going to report him. He said he is going to have the state of California police and my police to come to my job and pick me up in 24 hours then he hung up in my face.  And I know for a fact I haven't taken out a payday loan. That is just crazy that people are trying to scam others.
Of course, cash advance lenders have no problem with this. They’re usually more than willing to let you roll over a cash advance loan because that’s how they make their money—the more you roll it over, the more you pay in interest. And the alternative isn’t any better: If you stop making payments altogether and default, the lender can pursue legal action against you and potentially garnish your wages.4
*Approval depends upon meeting legal, regulatory and underwriting requirements. If approved, online loans are funded the next business day. All times and dates are based on Eastern Standard Time (EST). Check `n Go and third party lenders may, at their discretion, verify application information by using national databases that may provide information from one or more national credit bureaus, and Check `n Go or third party lenders may take that into consideration in the approval process.

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