If these a*s holes can't get you at home   or on your cell phone, they will continue calling you at work.  They will be from India, Nigeria, etc., using AMERICAN names and we all know they don't have American names.  Part of the time, there is that accent, you will NEVER be able to understand.  We have NEVER had a LOAN with this place and have even called them, they did research and told us NO, but it just seem to stop these scammers.  Just tell your job if they call your job that you no longer work there.  NEVER talk to this trash, ok?

It’s possible to tap into another workplace resource without counting on your boss’s approval: your 401(k). Although traditional advice would have you run for the hills before taking money out of your retirement account, it is actually one of the most cost-effective options. In fact, according to Investopedia, a 401(k) loan should be one of the first options you consider to address a short-term, but serious need for liquidity.

According to a 2016 study conducted by GOBankingRates, more than two-thirds of Americans have less than $1,000 saved, with 34 percent admitting to having absolutely no money in their savings account. Although today's consumers are more aware than ever about the importance of savvy spending, these statistics prompt the question: What does it take to be a successful saver? Luckily, this can be achieved in a handful of ways. Piggybacking on the ingenuity of Stephen Covey, author of "7 Habits of Highly Effective People," here are seven habits of highly successful savers.
Keep in mind that this option might be the most financially advantageous, but it can also be the most tricky to navigate. Borrowing money from a friend turns a personal relationship into a business one — you need to be comfortable with the fact that you are indebted to that person and the relationship could turn sour if you fail to uphold your end of the bargain.
1. I am a regular or reserve member of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or Coast Guard, serving on active duty under a call or order that does not specify a period of 30 days or fewer or dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty. A dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty as described above is the member's spouse, the member's child under the age of eighteen years old, or an individual for whom the member provided more than one-half of his/her financial support for 180 days immediately preceding today's date.

Affiliate Disclosure: There are links on this site that can be defined as affiliate links. This means that I may receive a small commission (at no cost to you) if you purchase something when clicking on the links that take you through to a different website. By clicking on the links, you are in no way obligated to buy.


Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not financial advice. Always consult p professional before making any financial decisions.

Copyright ©CashAdvancesBlog.com

×