A woman named Amy ** emailed and sent me a text that I was approved for $4000. Now I didn't need that much, but I called. Amy had a thick accent like from India. After straining to understand her she said it would be $250 per month. Not too bad I told her. But the catch... She wanted me to send them money first then they would deposit my money. What? She called it "insurance". I told her no and not to ever contact me again. Be aware of this company.
If you still believe we violated the law, you may file a written complaint including supporting documents or other evidence with the Office of Financial and Insurance Services. The Office is required to investigate your complaint and has the authority to order us to pay you restitution if they agree that we violated the law. In addition, the Office can order us to pay civil fines or take away our right to do business. To do so, contact the Office of Financial and Insurance Services toll-free at 1-877-999-6442.
USA CASH ADVANCE SCAM: Foreign accented man called to confirm a loan but needed me to obtain a new government law requiring a verification voucher! When I had money and was at CVS, 11/7, Walmart or other locations.....I was to call him and then he would tell me the person to whom I would make the voucher out to for a total of 260 dollars (down from 400). The loan would then be deposited into my account as soon as the voucher business was done. He informed that I had to process the voucher verification within the next 10 minutes and then my funds would then be in my account in 15 minutes (in thousands by the way). The voucher was to prove I could make monthly payments...REALLY? The amount of the loan was ridiculous- "too good to be true" type. So I said I could not do anything until tomorrow. Again he emphasized calling once I was in the store and would give me no information except that his name was James. (BTW: a young man answered the phone, James was giving the 888 number to another in the background and then took the phone to speak with me??!!)

It’s possible to tap into another workplace resource without counting on your boss’s approval: your 401(k). Although traditional advice would have you run for the hills before taking money out of your retirement account, it is actually one of the most cost-effective options. In fact, according to Investopedia, a 401(k) loan should be one of the first options you consider to address a short-term, but serious need for liquidity.


For instance, if a looming credit card or other loan payment is jeopardizing your ability to pay for basic expenses, see if you can work out a deal. “If you’re having trouble making your monthly payments, call your lender to ask for more time,” suggests Natasha Rachel Smith, consumer affairs expert at rebate website TopCashback. “You’d be surprised how willing they are to work with you on your payment schedule. … It pays to be transparent.”
In another case, the consumer reported that the caller threatened to seize the consumer’s bank account and serve the consumer with legal papers at his workplace unless he paid the debt. Another consumer reported being threatened with arrest. In one case, a consumer reported the debt collector threatened that he could have an arrest warrant issued if the consumer did not immediately pay him with a credit card. In other cases, consumers report the debt collector demanded payment using a pre-paid card.
Many people have trouble paying back their cash advance loans, and rollover is common. In fact, 80 percent of cash advances are rolled over or followed by another loan within 14 days of the first.3 And far too often it doesn’t end there. The loan becomes due and borrowers still can’t pay back the lump sum they owe, so what do they do? They roll it over once more and the cycle starts again.
The Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) has received complaints from Washington consumers of what appear to be loan collection scams. Numerous consumers reported they were contacted by entities claiming to collect debts owed to companies with “Cash Advance” in their names. The collection attempts often involve threats of lawsuits, asset seizure, and arrest. The consumers targeted did not actually owe the debt being collected. At least some of the consumers were targeted after they applied for loans from unlicensed online lenders.
To my suprise I got a call from an Annette ( the company name is now Cash advance now) They are aware of this scam. She verified I had no loan on file and confirmed that it was a scam!! She gave me her # of 888-663-6030 which I called back to verify was a good # which it was. She said if he calls back demand in writing, say to contact your attorney, etc. Do not give any info, ask them to verify what they have on file...more than likely they have last 4 of ssn, and bank acct #. I made the mistake of not asking so I can only guess that they have mine....be careful!!

The Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) warns consumers to verify that any lender with which they consider doing business holds a Washington State license for providing consumer loan services. Consumers are urged to verify licensing status prior to giving the lender nonpublic personal information, such as social security number and checking account access.

Credit card cash advances can come in handy when there’s a necessary expense that you can’t charge to your card (like rent) and you don’t have the funds to cover it otherwise. But the problem with credit card cash advances is that they have fees and interest rates that are generally much higher than if you just used your credit card to make a purchase. Also, you can only borrow as much as your cash advance limit allows, and if you already have a balance on your credit card, that amount may be reduced.
It has become clear from numerous reports of this scam, that the scammers have come into posession of a large amount of personal information, including names, addresses, phone numbers, references, bank acct. numbers and social security numbers. Most of those reporting the scam indicate that at some time in the past, they filled out an online loan application. My guess is that these scammers have obtained (most likely illegally) a large database of this personal info.

Cash Advance® is not a lender and does not provide short-term loans but refers consumers to lenders who may provide such loans. For this reason, we are unable to supply you with an exact APR (Annual Percentage Rate) that you will be charged if you choose to accept an offered loan. The loan interest rates are determined solely by your lender, with specific amounts determined based upon the information you submitted to the lender. Your lender provides the APR, loan fees, and other terms. For help in understanding and using our services, consumers may refer to the Questions section or Contact Us.
A line of credit probably doesn’t spring to mind when you are looking for a cash advance, but the CashNetUSA personal line of credit is fast and convenient when you need emergency cash. The application and approval process are the same as for our more traditional loans, and if approved, you can have cash in your bank account as soon as the next business day.

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Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not financial advice. Always consult p professional before making any financial decisions.

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