I just received the same exact call on my job. He said there are some charges being filed against me. I asked for what. He said he is going to read the affidavit and told me not to interrupt him. He had an accent too. He said that I took out a payday loan with Cash Advance USA last year using my US Bank account and that I wrote them bad checks and have closed my account. First of all my US Bank account is just 1 month old...I asked for his name and told him I was going to report him. He said he is going to have the state of California police and my police to come to my job and pick me up in 24 hours then he hung up in my face.  And I know for a fact I haven't taken out a payday loan. That is just crazy that people are trying to scam others.
Most recently, a consumer reported being contacted through email by an individual referring to himself as Victor Allen from Cash Advance USA. The email demanded payment for a cash advance the consumer reported never occurred. The consumer reported being provided with an alleged account payoff amount and being threatened with legal action if payment was not received.
I just received the same exact call on my job. He said there are some charges being filed against me. I asked for what. He said he is going to read the affidavit and told me not to interrupt him. He had an accent too. He said that I took out a payday loan with Cash Advance USA last year using my US Bank account and that I wrote them bad checks and have closed my account. First of all my US Bank account is just 1 month old...I asked for his name and told him I was going to report him. He said he is going to have the state of California police and my police to come to my job and pick me up in 24 hours then he hung up in my face.  And I know for a fact I haven't taken out a payday loan. That is just crazy that people are trying to scam others.
If you carry only credit cards for day-to-day spending, you could find yourself in a pinch when confronted with a cash-only situation, such as buying lunch from a street vendor, veggies at a farmers market or a sandwich at a mom-and-pop deli. In that case, a cash advance might be tempting. Some people also turn to credit card cash advances when they need paper money but don’t have enough in their bank account.
A cash advance loan works just like a payday loan. (Not surprising, since they’re the exact same thing.) To get one, you go to a payday lender and write a check. You date it for your next payday and make it out for the amount of the loan plus interest and fees. The lender will then give you cash or transfer money to your bank account. It’s yours to spend, but remember that check you wrote? As soon as your next payday arrives, the lender will cash it and the amount will be withdrawn from your bank account.
People who set goals for a purchase – whether it's a car, television or family vacation – are more apt to reduce unnecessary spending in pursuit of that goal. While other consumers use credit cards to purchase items they can't afford, effective savers rarely spend money they don't have. The next time you decide to invest in a big purchase, review your budget to see where you can make cuts to allocate more funds toward that goal. You can also boost your income to reach your savings goals quicker by taking on side jobs, such as freelance writing, dog walking or another gig that takes advantage of your marketable skills.
Some reasons you might take a cash advance loan include the need to make emergency repairs to a car or home, cover unplanned medical expenses or pay for assistance with short-term needs that can't wait. Parents might seek cash advances to help cover back-to-school expenses when paychecks don't quite meet needs. Ultimately, though, once a cash advance is funded, the cash is yours to spend or save as you please. LendUp works to provide cash advance loan services that are simple to understand.
1. I am a regular or reserve member of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or Coast Guard, serving on active duty under a call or order that does not specify a period of 30 days or fewer or dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty. A dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty as described above is the member's spouse, the member's child under the age of eighteen years old, or an individual for whom the member provided more than one-half of his/her financial support for 180 days immediately preceding today's date.

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