Payday loans grant you access to emergency funds that can help you deal with debts that pile up due to unexpected incidents. For example, a medical emergency could render you too sick to work, but the cost of a doctor could be too much for your current funds. No money, no doctor. No doctor, no work. No work, no money. Unfortunate cycles like this can lock you into a no-win situation.
Unlike cash advance loans and credit card cash advances, an employer cash advance is not a loan. The money you receive is yours—it comes straight out of your next paycheck. Not all employers offer cash advances, and those that do may have strict policies that limit the number of times you can request an advance and reserve approval for true emergencies.
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The Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) has received complaints from Washington consumers of what appear to be loan collection scams. Numerous consumers reported they were contacted by entities claiming to collect debts owed to companies with “Cash Advance” in their names. The collection attempts often involve threats of lawsuits, asset seizure, and arrest. The consumers targeted did not actually owe the debt being collected. At least some of the consumers were targeted after they applied for loans from unlicensed online lenders.
1. I am a regular or reserve member of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or Coast Guard, serving on active duty under a call or order that does not specify a period of 30 days or fewer or dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty. A dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty as described above is the member's spouse, the member's child under the age of eighteen years old, or an individual for whom the member provided more than one-half of his/her financial support for 180 days immediately preceding today's date.

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