One consumer reported receiving an email from a man calling himself William C. Jones, who claimed to work at a Federal Trade Commission office. He allegedly threatened to disclose the debt to the consumer’s employer, garnish wages, and file a lawsuit against the consumer. Another consumer reported receiving a similar e-mail from a person calling himself Neal Johnson. The consumer reported that what appear to be fake U.S. District Court arrest warrants were attached to these e-mails.
LendUp doesn't limit how your cash advance is used. Once you are approved for a cash advance loan amount and you receive those funds, the money is yours. LendUp does encourage responsible use of financial resources, which is why we offer financial education and the LendUp Ladder in eligible states. We want you to succeed financially, so our goal is to help eligible individuals build credit over time. Because of that commitment, we hope that individuals who take cash advances from LendUp use them responsibly.
Consumers should never make payments over the phone or via email to a third party debt collector that refuses to provide a written validation notice. Even if the party seems to have some of your personal or financial information, you should not make payments or provide bank account or credit card information without receiving a written validation notice. If the scammers already have your bank account information, social security number, or other nonpublic information, you may be a victim of identity theft. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has information for victims of identity theft available online at www.ftc.gov.

All of a sudden I started getting threatening emails from someone stating that if I do not pay an unverified debt that charges would be filed on my name and social security number. I replied back to the individual who emailed me and a demanded that they no longer contact me and that I was submitting a complaint to the CFPB and my Attorney General. They then replied back to me with the name, partial social security number, mailing address, phone number and amount owed of the person they believed to be me. I then sent the email to my Attorney General with my complaint.

To get a credit card cash advance you go to an ATM or bank location and use your credit card to withdraw money. The amount you withdraw is added to your credit card bill almost as if you were using your card to make a purchase. But unlike using a debit card, the money that you get through a credit card cash advance doesn’t come from your bank account. It’s loaned to you by your credit card company, and you’re responsible for paying it back.
The amount of your cash advance depends on several factors and will vary from state to state. The surest way to learn what amount you’re eligible for is to fill out our simple application. Ready to take action? The sooner you apply for a cash advance the sooner you can get the cash you need. If you’d like to know more about cash advances from Check `n Go, one of our customer service representatives will be happy to speak with you.

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Please Note: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not financial advice. Always consult p professional before making any financial decisions.

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