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<>According to a 2016 study conducted by GOBankingRates, more than two-thirds of Americans have less than $1,000 saved, with 34 percent admitting to having absolutely no money in their savings account. Although today's consumers are more aware than ever about the importance of savvy spending, these statistics prompt the question: What does it take to be a successful saver? Luckily, this can be achieved in a handful of ways. Piggybacking on the ingenuity of Stephen Covey, author of "7 Habits of Highly Effective People," here are seven habits of highly successful savers.
<>I was told I was approved for a $6000 loan. I had to go buy $147 in iTunes gift cards. I had to give them the number of the back of the cards. Which they redeemed after I gave the cards. Then they wanted me to send them $387 to finish my part saying that this will prove that I could pay the loan back, this was my verification process. Cash Advance USA, Dallas Texas ripped me off for $150. Something needs to be done to these con artists.
<>I received an email from someone saying I owe $300 but it has been moved up to $885 and they will be taking me to court and freezing my accounts, garnishing my wages. So I ask them to send the account number and when this was done no response. I have even ask for their phone number. All they keep saying is this is the final notice and how am I willing to settle. OKAY so I can't have your number. First of all why are we WRITING back and forth through emails.
<>The Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) warns consumers to verify that any lender with which they consider doing business holds a Washington State license for providing consumer loan services. Consumers are urged to verify licensing status prior to giving the lender nonpublic personal information, such as social security number and checking account access.
<>APR Disclosure. Some states have laws limiting the APR that a lender can charge you. APRs range from widely and can be from 200% to 1386%. Loans from a state that has no limiting laws or loans from a bank not governed by state laws may have an even higher APR. The Annual Percentage Rate is the rate at which your loan accrues interest and is based upon the amount, cost and term of your loan, repayment amounts and timing of payments. Lenders are legally required to show you the APR and other terms of your loan before you execute a loan agreement.
<>I just got the same report from a officer richard jones on my voice mail 4/26/2012. I called him back and told him I checked my account before I called him back and I told him he was just trying to get money out of me and that I would get a law suit against him and his company for harrasment and not to call me anymore. He said he would not call and he hope I would not get arrested. I looked them up and found this sight. Thank God For this information. I wish we could get these people arrested.
<>He said my SSN, DLN, and so forth were going to be blacklisted and that they were calling from the FDIC. He said that I had a loan with Cash USA (I had never heard of them before today). He kept offering for me to settle the issue outside of court, but if not they were going to bring federal charges against me and said that I had violated federal laws. At this time I began to Google Cash USA and that's how I found this site and other listings that said it was a scam.
<>NM Residents: This lender is licensed and regulated by the New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department, Financial Institutions Division, P.O. Box 25101, 2550 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504. To report any unresolved problems or complaints, contact the division by telephone at (505) 476-4885 or visit the website http://www.rld.state.nm.us/financialinstitutions/.
<>I first got an UKNOWN call which I usually don't answer. The guy, with a Middle Eastern accent, said he was Deputy Mike Anderson and called from 313-420-6843. He said they had received a complaint against me and if I didn't call this other number to find out what it was about that they would be issuing a warrant. So I'm already laughing like "What BS is this about?" Because I don't bother anyone and am most certainly not a criminal. So I call the number which is a Maryland number 410-390-9007. The guy whose name I was given was Mark Taylor and he put me on hold to pull up my file.
<>The Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) has received complaints from Washington consumers of what appear to be loan collection scams. Numerous consumers reported they were contacted by entities claiming to collect debts owed to companies with “Cash Advance” in their names. The collection attempts often involve threats of lawsuits, asset seizure, and arrest. The consumers targeted did not actually owe the debt being collected. At least some of the consumers were targeted after they applied for loans from unlicensed online lenders.
<>When you receive a raise, it's tempting to spend more money on things and experiences that make you happy. However, the "hedonic treadmill" theory suggests that even though an income boost can make us feel like we've earned an uptick in spending, our newfound windfall will eventually leave us as unsatisfied as we were prior to the raise because our needs don't disappear – they just get grander. Savvy savers know to avoid lifestyle inflation during periods of income growth and invest in themselves instead. This can mean upping retirement contributions or diverting the difference into a savings account, emergency fund or toward some other financial goal.
<>Spending less than you earn is key to staying afloat financially, yet many of us rely on credit cards to fund our lifestyles. With more than $16,000 in credit card debt per household in America, many of us struggle to understand what we can and cannot afford. Successful savers are very clear on that point and often live a frugal lifestyle despite having an income that can afford some luxuries. Warren Buffett, for example, still resides in the home he purchased for just $31,500 nearly 60 years ago, despite being one of the wealthiest people on the planet. Take it from Buffett: Maintaining a frugal lifestyle while your income continues to grow will help you reach your financial goals sooner.
<>So I have been constantly getting these silly emails from Cash Advance USA, I have no idea whom they are. Never took out a loan from any of these institutions. But I like messing with them when I do get them. Easiest way to figure out it is a scam, promptly ask them, "How can I send you the money so I can clear my name today?" They will come back with a stupid email saying if you pay '**' amount they will call it paid in full. I then ask them again, "How can I send the money right now to take advantage of this great settlement amount?" Their response would be something like what I received from them again. Stupid scam.
<>Cash Advance® is not a lender and does not provide short-term loans but refers consumers to lenders who may provide such loans. For this reason, we are unable to supply you with an exact APR (Annual Percentage Rate) that you will be charged if you choose to accept an offered loan. The loan interest rates are determined solely by your lender, with specific amounts determined based upon the information you submitted to the lender. Your lender provides the APR, loan fees, and other terms. For help in understanding and using our services, consumers may refer to the Questions section or Contact Us.
<> I had the same thing happen to me today. The man continued to call me 7 times after i told him i would contact the police for harassment. They then attacked my boyfriend when he answered the phone. These people have been calling over and over all day long almost every other day. Sometimes will even leave a message. He then tried to get me to give out my social security number when i told him that if he could prove i took out the loan he should have my social and then he kept trying to get me to fall for it. I know for a fact that i do not and never have had a loan with this company. Do not fall for anything they say its all lies and they just want your money!!! Someone needs to stop this!
<>All of a sudden I started getting threatening emails from someone stating that if I do not pay an unverified debt that charges would be filed on my name and social security number. I replied back to the individual who emailed me and a demanded that they no longer contact me and that I was submitting a complaint to the CFPB and my Attorney General. They then replied back to me with the name, partial social security number, mailing address, phone number and amount owed of the person they believed to be me. I then sent the email to my Attorney General with my complaint.
<>If you received a loan from a lender or owed money to a business and someone other than the lender or business is now attempting to collect from you, the collection activity may be subject to the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. If you receive a communication from a party claiming that a debt is owed, you can request a “written validation notice,” which must include the amount of the debt, the name of the creditor you owe, and your rights under the FDCPA. If you have questions regarding federal debt collection laws, you can contact the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP or online at www.ftc.gov.
<>We'll also ask for your employment details or the source of any recurring income. Once you complete an application with LendUp for a short-term loan, we provide an answer instantly. We don't rely on a traditional credit check or credit score to make lending decisions, opening the door for individuals who might have struggled with credit in the past. You won't have to fax any documents or wait days for an answer. LendUp's short-term loan options usually offer approved first-time borrowers up to $250; by paying on time and working with LendUp again in the future, you might be able to increase how much you can borrow at a time (availability varies by state).
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