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I just got an email claiming that I had to get in touch with this company because of a $300 cash advance, and now owe $885.59. They claim to be taking legal action. I never heard of them and I have no idea who these people are. There is also no phone number on the email. I'm positive this is a scam and I think they are probably another out of the country scamming outfit.
Both men had Middle Eastern accents. The second guy kept saying "While on this federally recorded line are you willing to settle this situation"? I kept laughing at him saying that to attempt to scare me. I said I don't know what you're talking about and I know that this is a scam so I won't be paying anything, will be calling the Consumer Protection Bureau, and please take my number off of your call list at which time I was hung up on.
Paying bills on time is crucial to financial management, but what about paying yourself as part of that commitment? People who consider their future selves just as important as their monthly mortgage are more effective at building savings accounts. To build up your savings on a consistent basis, start "paying yourself first" by setting aside a certain amount each pay period for your savings account. Treat this account just like you would a recurring bill and, if possible, make it automatic. You can also download a tool like Digit, which reviews your spending and finds unused funds to transfer into an FDIC-insured savings account.

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