1. I am a regular or reserve member of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or Coast Guard, serving on active duty under a call or order that does not specify a period of 30 days or fewer or dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty. A dependent of a member of the Armed Forces on active duty as described above is the member's spouse, the member's child under the age of eighteen years old, or an individual for whom the member provided more than one-half of his/her financial support for 180 days immediately preceding today's date.
For most people, a cash advance (also known as a payday advance) is something associated with a credit card or other line of credit. Many credit card companies make it easy for customers to receive cash advances nearby by using their credit card at a local ATM. The problem with such tactics is that the costs of the advance can add up quickly and you might not even realize what all those costs are. You'll likely pay an ATM fee charged by the bank that runs the machine, and you might also pay a fee to the credit card company for taking the advance, along with finance charges and interest if you don't pay the money back before your next billing cycle. Some credit card companies charge interest on cash advances that is higher than the interest charged on regular balances, which can make for surprising increases in your total balance.
I am working on my college assignment, when I take a break and check my cell phone. I received not one but three calls from PCS ( a collection agency) and they left one message urging me to contact a Thomas Williams about an overdue payday advance. I returned his call many times to try to explain that I never received a payday advance loan of any sort. He first claimed it was done in May of 2010 and again in August of 2011. He had my social security number, my name and cell number, and my girlfriend's name.
I had received automated calls from this company 3-4 days in a row. I wanted to consolidate my credit cards. I decided to call back but every time I called, I would get a recording that the person I was trying to reach was not able to receive calls and to try later. Right then and there I thought... hmmm, this has got to be a scam. The following week, I received another call, I too, spoke with a woman with a very thick accent not to mention there was so much noise in the background, it was even more harder to hear her. Nevertheless, we began the loan process, until we got to the point she requested my username & password for my checking account. Do I really look like boo boo the clown. What legitimate company will ask for that info. When I asked her why she needed that info, she replied, they need to access the account to make sure it's my account. I told her she is a liar, accessing my account does not prove that it's my account.
For most people, a cash advance (also known as a payday advance) is something associated with a credit card or other line of credit. Many credit card companies make it easy for customers to receive cash advances nearby by using their credit card at a local ATM. The problem with such tactics is that the costs of the advance can add up quickly and you might not even realize what all those costs are. You'll likely pay an ATM fee charged by the bank that runs the machine, and you might also pay a fee to the credit card company for taking the advance, along with finance charges and interest if you don't pay the money back before your next billing cycle. Some credit card companies charge interest on cash advances that is higher than the interest charged on regular balances, which can make for surprising increases in your total balance.

If you carry only credit cards for day-to-day spending, you could find yourself in a pinch when confronted with a cash-only situation, such as buying lunch from a street vendor, veggies at a farmers market or a sandwich at a mom-and-pop deli. In that case, a cash advance might be tempting. Some people also turn to credit card cash advances when they need paper money but don’t have enough in their bank account.
Check ‘N Go OH License #SM.501663, #CS.900077, and #CC.700416. Rhode Island licensed check casher. California operations licensed by the California Department of Business Oversight pursuant to the California Deferred Deposit Transaction Law and the California Financing Law. Texas and Ohio originate by a third party lender, restrictions apply. Eastern Specialty Finance, Inc., D/B/A Check ‘N Go is licensed by the Delaware State Bank Commissioner pursuant to 5 Del. C. sec. 2201 et. al., and expires 12/31/2018.

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